Maintaining fitness as a medical professional

A doctor or nurse who sacrifices his/her health for the well being of his/her patients is very noble indeed, but can end in disaster if not attended to in early stages.

Burn – out is highly likely both in body and mind, when one performs the same tasks over and over in mere robotic fashion. This in turn, has led to higher incidence of myocardial infarction, cardiac failure, diabetes, hypertension, high LDL levels and stroke, even among medical professionals.

As medical and paramedical staff, we need to uphold what we preach, that is, spend time to take care of our physical, mental and spiritual health.

METHOD I: ‘SPACE – APART’ (verb) DIFFERENT INVESTIGATIONS:

In the field of ophthalmology, medical service has evolved to facilitate faster patient care, hence leading to many tests being done in one shot, without bothering to take a step.

This is how most institutions check their patients:

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That is, they perform microscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy and refraction on the same apparatus.

THIS IS HOW I HAVE PLACED THE INSTRUMENTS I USE:

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As you can see, I need to take twelve to sixteen steps between two or three different locations to get tests done. Hence, if I spend time with forty patients in a day, that would amount to a total of 480 to 640 steps – and that is only a minimum!

When seeing each of these patients at each apparatus, I would essentially be performing a half squat for each patient in two or three areas accounting for a total of four to six reps each.

Compared to an ophthalmologist who just sits in one place and performs health care, my method will exceed theirs’ by a minimum of 400 steps and 80 half squats.

2. TAKE A MINUTE OFF BETWEEN EACH CASE:

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Utilise this for deep breathing, prayer or simple exercises, such as torso twists on a swivel chair.
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3. USE SNACK AND MEAL BREAKS WISELY:

– Allot a separate area such as the mess, canteen or lounge, preferably reached by climbing two or more flights of stairs.

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– Finish your snack or meal, before catching up with co – workers. This will prevent you from over snacking while gossiping.

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– Avoid added sugar in beverages and make sure to drain excess oil from snacks using tissue paper. This will save you from a minimum of 20 calories per snack, working up to saving a minimum of 2500 calories per month!

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– Bring fruits to work, if you want to avoid deep fried snacks in the morning. An apple packs 90 calories and can sustain your energy levels till lunch.

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4. NEVER WORK TO THE LEVEL OF BURN OUT:

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– If you are losing your patience, replying curtly to patients, or getting a stress headache, congrats! You are now officially a member of Health Professionals Burn – Out Club!

-You may be a health professional, but you are also a human being. To treat your patients well, you need to take care of your health. Avail your time – out now!

5. USE HOLIDAYS PROPERLY:
Instead of relaxing in a sofa or bed all day, try a relaxed one hour walk in the morning and a one hour swim in the evening with your loved one or take a trip to spend more time with family.

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IT MAY SEEM CRUEL, BUT THE WORLD CAN WAIT. AFTER YOU RECHARGE YOU CAN WORK WONDERS IN MANY MORE LIVES THAN YOU WOULD HAVE DURING A BURNOUT.

6. ALCOHOL, ON THE BACK – BURNER:

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Aim for total abstinence, or a once in a month binge. Anything more frequent than that, can have its repercussions.

7. BURN CALORIES WHENEVER POSSIBLE:

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OPT FOR:
– Stairs over elevators or escalators
– A 400 metre walk to a shop, over a car/bike ride to the same shop.
– A 2 km cycle ride, over a car/bike ride
– A game of shuttle, or an intense gym session, over a period of lazing in bed.

9. AVOID FAST FOOD AND JUNK FOOD:

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Indian junk foods like fried rice, fried chicken or oil dripping gravy, and foods from Italian or American or Chinese cuisines like pizzas, subs and burgers may be the in – thing at your hospital’s canteen or on your everyday menu, but that has to change.

– Opt for brown rice over white rice, switch to olive or coconut oil, but avoid deep frying. Prefer boiled or grilled meat to fried meat. Prefer green leafy vegetables to starchy ones like potatoes. Heap your plate with vegetables and allot only less than a quarter of your serving for sources of plain carb, like rice.

10. REST:

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A regular human needs 8 hours of sleep. The same applies for doctors and paramedical staff.
A good night’s sleep prepares the body and mind for both mental and physical assault, which are very common among those who work in well – known hospitals.

AND FINALLY..

NEVER SMOKE. IF YOU DO, YOU KNOW ITS’ CONSEQUENCES BETTER THAN ANYONE ELSE.

– So the next time a patient asks more queries than expected, or when the turn out of patients exceed expectations, you won’t be feeling stressed. Enjoy what you do, ladies and gentlemen, and the first thing to do to enjoy your work, is to keep yourself healthy. A very good day to you all.

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Eyelid repair and a Car – Tyre Repair!

Jan, the 13th, 2014: I suppose it would be what you would call a slightly different day at work. I had just performed 5 cataract surgeries and gotten back to the out patient department, when an anxious mother entered my room with her one year old girl child. She gave a gruesome history of the child falling down and hitting her eye over a sharp stone by the roadside. Examination revealed a full – thickness eyelid tear, with the tissue dangling by a narrow saving margin. The kid needed general anesthesia and I asked the mother if they wanted to be referred to another center of ours, which was two and a half hours away. Since she was anxious, we called our own anesthetist

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and I got started right away. (photo shows a similar picture and does not belong to this patient)

On table, under anesthesia, I examined her well (she wouldn’t let me touch her at the outpatient department). Other than the eyelid – tear, the rest of her eye was normal (thank God). What followed was a ‘grey – line’ approximation, and mattress sutures, followed by progressively superficial layers of suturing up to the skin. Total procedure took an hour. Finally, content with the job, I admitted the patient for observation after prescribing systemic antibiotics and painkillers in the form of a tonic.

The next thing on my mind was to finish a few more important cases at the OPD before a good lunch at home. Unfortunately, fate decided to play a different hand. When I was about to leave for home, I noticed my car had a flat (rear right tyre). Following this I had no other choice but to have lunch at the hospital, after arranging for one of the staff at workplace (Mohan, who had run the marathon with me) to change the punctured tyre. By the time I had finished my meal, the punctured tyre was off the ‘Ritz’. Then came the screwing in of the spare tyre. After this, I went along with Mohan to bring the spare tyre to normal pressure and to get the punctured one patched up. Phew! Long day, but successful.
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(And oh, the cause of the flat was a screw by the way – seriously?)